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Monday, May 10
 

12:00pm CDT

A New Script (أنا, איי, 我) in the Virtual World: EdTech Tools
One of the main challenges to online language teaching is incorporating writing instruction for languages using different scripts such as Arabic, Hebrew, and Chinese. This presentation is a showcase of some of the up-to-date edtech tools that proved to be effective in overcoming obstacles in the new script learning process. Platforms like Nearpod, Kahoot, and Wizer.me can enable creating an engaging and interactive script learning environment. Concrete examples from Arabic, Hebrew and Chinese will be demonstrated. The presentation will start with Kahoot as an excellent entertaining tool that can be used as a warmup and/or a wrap-up and exit ticket to learned skills.

A second tool used for in-class activities is Nearpod, which allows instructors to create a wide range of activities in class, such as polls, fill-in-the-blanks, and reading and responding through multimodal methods including audio, video and writing, with a timer set up on the platform.

The third part of the presentation will introduce Wizer.me, a platform for interactive worksheets. After class, Wizer.me provides an opportunity to create meaningful assessment and provide feedback through a variety of tasks a learner can complete, such as matching, sorting, and recording.

Speakers
avatar for Rana Raddawi

Rana Raddawi

Assistant Professor of Instruction, Arabic, Northwestern University
Dr. Rana Raddawi holds a Ph.D. in Translation Studies Arabic/English/French from Sorbonne University in Paris, France. She has more than 15 years of teaching experience in the West and the Middle East at the graduate and undergraduate levels. She has supervised a number of Master... Read More →
avatar for Ronit Alexander

Ronit Alexander

Lecturer, Hebrew Language, Northwestern University


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

An Innovative Approach to Content-Based Language Teaching: Iconic Cities
This presentation discusses the design and development of three new courses in the MENA languages program in Arabic, Hebrew, and Turkish based on the iconic cities of Cairo, Jerusalem, and Istanbul. The courses were developed during summer and fall 2020 using a shared pedagogical model based on the newest language-learning theories. Instructors met weekly to develop new teaching materials, sharing and discussing learning strategies and technologies across three languages. The new courses are being taught in spring 2021.

These courses are designed for students in the Intermediate MID/Intermediate HIGH levels of language proficiency on the ACTFL scale. Course materials and interactive exercises follow the ACTFL can-do statements for these levels. With these courses, we move away from a traditional textbook-based model to content-based course material. We use authentic texts and multimedia sources, presented in a multisensory way, to advance students’ language proficiency and broaden their cultural knowledge. All material is accompanied by creative language-learning exercises that use various technologies available in Canvas to help students function across different registers and genres. The main goal for these exercises using authentic materials is to create engaging class sessions around timely cultural topics and maintain lively connections with and among the students.

Speakers
avatar for Oya Topcuoglu

Oya Topcuoglu

Assistant Professor of Instruction, Northwestern University
Oya Topçuoğlu is an Assistant Professor of Instruction in the Middle East and North African Languages Program at Northwestern University. Dr.  Topçuoğlu teaches on a range of subjects, including modern Turkish language and culture, and the history and archaeology of the Middle... Read More →
avatar for Franziska Lys

Franziska Lys

Professor, German, Northwestern University


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Better Connect Online or Anytime Through Coaching in COVID and Beyond
Online or in person, the philosophical tenets of coaching always provide a powerful tool for faculty to better connect with trainees, even in today's busy clinical arena. Beginning with a “grit and growth” mindset, followed by the rapid establishment of a coaching relationship, sets the stage for purposeful observations and reflection. The speaker will share insights gained from two decades of coaching at the bedside in the emergency department, on the soccer fields, remotely in the sim lab, via Zoom to help speakers prepare for talks, and even within online MedEd and POCUS communities. Through a review of the latest and greatest coaching literature, attendees will be able to define the three tenets of coaching in any culture or context. Next, attendees will learn effective step-by-step strategies to start applying coaching habits to their daily work as educators and coaches. By the end of the engaging talk, attendees will learn practical strategies to help their trainees and their colleagues find joy in community and lifelong learning through coaching in #MedEd!

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Building a Learning Community by Building Personal Websites
Online language class is challenging due to its high demand for synchronous interactions. For students to speak up, creating a comfortable and encouraging atmosphere is essential, but this becomes especially difficult in a virtual classroom.

In response to this challenge, a project was designed to enhance learning, facilitate student-student interaction, and help build a dynamic learning community. Different from traditional writing assignments, this project required listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. It turned the previous unrelated assignments for each unit into one showcase, serving an authentic communicative purpose – helping students know each other.

The presentation will give a step-by-step walk-through on how the project was carried out throughout the quarter and offer a brief demonstration of the technology tools involved. Students’ feedback will also be included, together with the presenter’s reflection on how to further improve the design of the project.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Building Connections and Empathy Through Ethnographic Interviews
The resurgence of Black Lives Matter protests in summer 2020 made the content of my fall course on inequality in America even more crucial. But how could I ensure that my largely international student body (at Northwestern University’s Qatar campus) connected academically and emotionally with racial inequality in the U.S.? At the forefront of anti-racist pedagogy is the development of “students’ skills for self-reflection and self-awareness” (Ortega et al. 2018). I found the following teaching strategy useful for facilitating self-reflection, connection, and empathy, which can be applied to learning communities in the U.S. or abroad. Specifically, I worked with my student TA to create a package of ethnographic interviews on Black and POC (people of color) experiences in Qatar (conducted remotely due to the pandemic), and I built this original research into the class’s first major assessment. After learning important theoretical concepts, students reflected on how these key ideas, terms, and concepts traveled across contexts by using the ethnographic interviews to discuss their own positionality and the inequalities in our community in Qatar. Student assessments demonstrated their deep learning and engagement with the ethnographic materials, and “their power in shifting peoples’ perspective by looking into others’ personal and lived experiences.”


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Collaborative Case Study Analysis: A Novel Approach to Collective Learning
What happens when you combine the traditional case study analysis with discussion board assignments? What if...student teams are empowered to moderate discussion board threads as research strings for their case analysis? What if...fellow students become research assistants for a team of students who are responsible for the week's featured case study? Northwestern University Assistant Professor Judy Franks shares a novel approach to collaborative case learning that empowers student groups to engage their fellow classmates as researchers on a particular case study through discussion boards. Each week, a different team of students becomes responsible for stewarding the entire class cohort's analysis and understanding of an assigned case. The team owns it all, from objectives and discussion board moderation to the case analysis and class presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Judy Franks

Judy Franks

Lecturer, Integrated Marketing Communications, Northwestern University


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Connect with Your Virtual Audience Using Green Screen or Lightboard
The pandemic era of virtual teaching is challenging our ability to connect with the audience. Standard technologies of teaching with a tablet or slides reduce you, the presenter, to a tiny avatar in the corner of the screen. This makes it challenging to maintain a face-to-face connection with your audience. If only there were a way to make the virtual setting feel less...virtual. The good news is that $200 buys you the green-screen studio: lights, a green backdrop, and a microphone that, with a little bit of free software magic, allow you to walk virtually in front of your slides while maintaining eye contact with your audience, just like weather people do on TV. For another $100, you can build a DIY lightboard, which is basically a transparent whiteboard. You write on it using glow-in-the-dark markers while looking directly through it into the camera. You can even "project” plots and movies onto the lightboard alongside your writing. Some students have reported that the lightboard technique provided them with a better learning experience than a regular, in-person classroom. Here, I showcase both the green screen and lightboard technologies and share my experience using these creative solutions for teaching online.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Tchekhovskoy

Alexander Tchekhovskoy

Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Connecting Passions and Expertise to Develop Physics Lab Software
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the lack of educational physics software, specifically for simulation-based labs. By empowering students to connect their passions in coding and expertise in physics, tools were developed to address the lab's issues. This talk will discuss the development and integration of the current lab circuit simulation software used by Northwestern's physics labs.

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Course Materials with Study.Net and SN+ Tools
The Study.Net platform helps instructors organize digital course materials and make them easily available to students. See how course bundles are created and made available to students using materials from a variety of sources.

New to Study.Net, SN+ Tools allows instructors to add an interactive layer of comments, questions, and quizzes to course materials for deeper engagement with the course content. Even more SN+ Tools are coming soon!

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: Office Hours

Speakers
JM

Jay McGoodwin

Study.Net

Sponsors
avatar for Study.Net

Study.Net

Study.Net lets educators assemble, manage, and deliver digital course content and gives students the ability to use this content anytime, anywhere.


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Creating a New Undergraduate Course on Diversity, Inclusion, and Writing: Tackling Difficult Subjects
In winter 2021, we used children’s picture books as a method for tackling difficult subjects because the literature addresses race, gender, inequality, and many important contemporary issues. Students read over 100 books, talked to many guest speakers, and wrote an academic paper after having an in-depth consultation one-on-one with a librarian expert on a personal topic of choice. Each student then wrote a children’s picture book about a specific interest and that book was reviewed by a NYC book editor. The course was audited with an analysis: Students benefited mightily in their thinking on difficult subjects and how to consider tackling them in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Candy Lee

Candy Lee

Professor, Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications
Candy Lee is a professor at Medill, teaching in journalism and in integrated marketing communications. Previously she was vice president of marketing at The Washington Post, overseeing multiple functions, from marketing to research, and originating innovative programs.Prior to joining... Read More →


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Creating and Maintaining Connections During the Great Disconnect
Like so many others, our institution was greatly impacted by the disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020, transitioning from mostly in-person to virtually all remote instruction. In this presentation, we highlight two of the activities we undertook to connect students with technology and decision-makers with information about our educational technology services during this period of disruption. These steps included: 1) surveying student and faculty technology needs just prior to going virtual, and again, this time in collaboration with other campus units, at the close of the spring semester, and 2) creating and refining a technology services dashboard to track usage of various technology services.

In this presentation, we will cover some of the core findings from the surveys in terms of readiness for and reaction to remote learning, from both the faculty and student perspective. For instance, both groups had the hardware and software necessary to learn, teach, and work online, thanks in part to a laptop and hotspot loan program initiated in March through this survey. We will also show and describe the evolution of our technology services report, which started as a weekly update to leadership and is now being refined into a once per semester report.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt

Speakers
avatar for Alia Lancaster

Alia Lancaster

Senior Research and Assessment Analyst, University of Maryland
As a Senior Research and Assessment Analyst, Dr. Lancaster conducts research, analysis, and evaluations to to characterize and assess the user experience of students, faculty, and staff with academic technology services and tools. In order to provide action-oriented insights to the... Read More →
avatar for Martyn Clark

Martyn Clark

Data Scientist, University of Maryland
I am a Data Scientist with the Academic Technology Experience group at the University of Maryland's Division of Information Technology. I received my PhD from the University of Hawaii and have previously worked as a researcher, proficiency test developer, and English as a Second Language... Read More →


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Creating Virtual Connections and Collaborations
How does one develop connections and foster teamwork in a class where creativity and collaboration are major goals, although none of the students ever meet in person? Last quarter I remotely taught Class Composition (for non-composition majors and for music and non-music majors) in Northwestern’s music school. Class Composition helps students discover and hone their compositional voices. Creating a community remotely that enhances student compositional development became my priority. This presentation focuses on creating meaningful virtual connections among and between teacher to students and student to student while maximizing class engagement and collaboration. I met individually with all students throughout the quarter, trying to get to know them, including learning their goals and concerns, and analyzing their compositions, incorporating my detailed feedback. Group listening breakout rooms using guided questions I prepared nurtured student engagement. Live class performances by student volunteers further enhanced teamwork and investment. I recruited talented guests to further stimulate class participation and appreciation. A class community spirit evolved.

Speakers
avatar for Liza Sobel

Liza Sobel

Doctoral Candidate in Music Composition and Faculty, Northwestern University
How does one develop connections and foster teamwork in a class where creativity and collaboration are major goals, although none of the students ever meet in person? Last quarter I remotely taught Class Composition (for non-composition majors and for music and non-music majors) in... Read More →


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Cynap by WolfVision
WolfVision provides presentation, collaboration, and visualizer systems. Learn about Cynap, the WolfVision solution for remote and hybrid learning that connects all the systems and tools needed to teach in an intuitive interface.

Cynap provides a consistent learning experience for in-person, hybrid, and remote learners. Just like a smartphone combined multiple functions into one device, Cynap brings teaching tools together to make multi-modal teaching with tech tools easy. As the educational landscape continues to evolve and student expectations of remote and hybrid learning experiences increase, Cynap integrates the hardware and software in a user-friendly workflow to meet the moment.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: Office Hours

Speakers
BC

Bill Cook

WolfVision

Sponsors
avatar for WolfVision

WolfVision

WolfVision is a leading global developer and manufacturer of award-winning wireless presentation, collaboration, and knowledge-sharing systems and solutions.


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Discussion Hero: Saving Students from Boring Discussions
Discussion Hero is a superhero-themed interface built on top of Canvas discussions. With Discussion Hero, students can choose their side: Heroes or Villains. Then they choose an avatar and a name to post anonymously but consistently under one name within the course. With Discussion Hero, you can supercharge your Canvas discussions!

Speakers
JG

Jacob Guerra-Martinez

Northwestern University
avatar for Dan Murphy

Dan Murphy

Director of Online Learning Technologies, Northwestern University, School of Professional Studies
Interested in:- improving online course content and teaching with learning analytics- providing students with learning analytics data as feedback on their in-class performance to improve motivation and engagement- new learning technologies for online courses
avatar for Reba-Anna Lee

Reba-Anna Lee

Assistant Dean of Distance Learning
avatar for Jacob Collins

Jacob Collins

Senior Software Developer, Northwestern University
Learning Apps, Canvas, Amazon Web Services, 3D printing, Woodworking, Bicycling, really anything!


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Durable Medical Equipment Ordering Education Quality Improvement Project
Clinicians need to be informed of proper documentation including medical justification for durable medical equipment (DME), insurance regulations, and the DME ordering process to ensure safe equipment for patients at discharge. Quality improvement projects can be a great way to create a needs assessment based on chart reviews and focus groups of occupational therapists (OTs), physical therapists (PTs), and case managers about their current challenges with ordering DME during inpatient rehabilitation. Information can then be utilized to create a self-paced online module with use of an instructional designer. The focus group discussion was organized to provide recommendations the PTs, OTs, and case managers would find beneficial in the learning module. The interactive online course has been organized into five modules: Overview of DME, Clinical Problem-Solving Discussions, Wheelchairs, Clinical Problem Solving for DME Selection, and Navigating Challenging Equipment Situations. It is hypothesized that the learning module will facilitate successful ordering of equipment when patients arrive so that they are able to be discharged safely from inpatient rehabilitation. A post-test embedded into the module as well as reference sheets for a summary of the most important points will be given to all participating clinicians.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8my

Speakers
avatar for Sally Taylor

Sally Taylor

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine
I currently serve as Associate Director, Flex Staff, Interpreter Services, Wheelchair & Seating Center at the Shirley Ryan Abilitylab, formerly the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Over the past 20 years, I have served in a variety of Therapy Manager and Physical Therapist roles... Read More →


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Engaging Students with Real-Time Technology and Gamification for Under $5
How do professors increase student engagement and gain quick feedback on the effectiveness of students utilizing course-specific vocabulary? Explore how I have blended online polling and gamification in a unique way that promotes student engagement and retention with minimal expenses. A demonstration of students playing the game will be included in the recording. “Descriptionary” develops students’ verbal communication skills and enhances their ability to describe, analyze, and categorize images. Using a free website, I created polls with several similar images. The students take turns as the Descriptor, who is secretly assigned an image to describe. They are limited by categories rolled on dice (for an added degree of difficulty) as the rest of the class is trying to guess which image is being narrated. The Descriptor then sees what image(s) the class has selected, giving them immediate feedback about how effective their explanation has been. Then they can revise and expand their language to guide students to the intended image. At the end of each round, we do a word cloud to evaluate what keywords were most helpful and what additional information could have been provided to aid the class. This is a warm-up and practice activity with a prep time of 10 to 30 minutes and a cost of $0 to $5.

Demo Videos on how to setup up Descriptionary on PollEverywhere.com and of students playing the game are available on my YouTube: 
https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8v5GWRFIISf1JFdpnJEo2wsqykEAO29w


Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt


Speakers
avatar for Maya Fein

Maya Fein

Assistant Professor of Theatre, Professor at Wofford College
Maya joined the Theatre faculty at Wofford College as an Assistant Professor in 2020. She serves as an educator, production manager, and lighting designer within the department. She also continues to be a freelance designer and Argentine Tango instructor across the country.Originally... Read More →



Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Flipping the Online Classroom: Strategic Use of Breakout Rooms
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, teaching and learning remotely through Zoom in higher education has become the new reality. In this context, breakout rooms have become an ideal tool to facilitate student collaboration, which is both frequent and necessary in the in-person classroom. In fact, breakout rooms could be an effective ally to fully implement the flipped-classroom methodology in any subject, maximizing the time that our students invest in a synchronous class. Moreover, this online format can reinforce the idea of the instructor as a facilitator of the students' learning process.

One of the challenges that instructors may face in this remote environment is the restricted access to these breakout rooms, which can limit supervision over what is happening when students are "out of sight" while class is in session. In addition, we will address the students' perspective on the use of breakout rooms, along with its efficiency as a learning tool to align teaching goals and learning outcomes.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8my

Speakers
avatar for Elena Lanza

Elena Lanza

Faculty, Northwestern University


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Formative Feedback for Teachers
Moving the classroom online can lead to microaggressions and other “acts of oppression” (Ortega et al. 2018; see also Kelly 2013), which can leave students feeling marginalized or socially threatened, negatively impacting their learning (Petriglieri 2011; Purdie-Vaughns et al. 2008). How can we ensure that our online classrooms remain safe spaces for students to learn together? My suggestion: Create multiple formative feedback mechanisms that ensure ongoing and safe outlets for students to express feedback. Just as we add formative assessments alongside our summative (evaluative, end-of-class) assessments (Hattie and Timperley 2007), we should also add formative feedback mechanisms to our summative course evaluations. I’ll share the four mechanisms I created in my Fall 2020 classes: multiple part-time TAs, Canvas Exit Tickets, an always available anonymous Qualtrics survey, and CTEC custom questions on the success of the class in creating a “safe and respectful learning environment,” “positive connections with peers,” and a “positive relationship with your instructor.” In addition to midterm and end-of-semester evaluations, these feedback structures made me feel more comfortable knowing that I could be alerted if there were any issues of cultural sensitivity or other concerns.


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Glass Half-Full: Online Synchronous Activities with a Face-to-Face Future
In 2020, there was a scramble in higher ed to get courses online. Much was said about the negatives – slapdash, technical difficulties, and, most importantly, the difficulty of maintaining meaningful professor-student and student-student connections. Glass Half-Full explores the positives of this shift through six lenses:

  • Connecting the dots: Opportunity to redesign the flow and content of courses
  • Connecting with technology: Freedom to try new tools and test with students
  • Connecting with each other: Ease of collaboration on personal devices
  • Connecting communities to the classroom: Access to resources remotely
  •  Connecting with your environment: Activities that were possible because students were not in the classroom
  • Connecting with yourself: Exploring different kinds of engagement and empathetic responses

For each of these categories, professors will share activities that they utilized in their classes in 2020, how they determined the activity was successful, and how they plan to continue or expand them when in-person classes become the norm again. Reenactments of these activities will pair with the interview audio for fictional class “COVID Connections.”

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8my

Speakers
avatar for Cecile-Anne Sison

Cecile-Anne Sison

Instructional Technology Lead, Media and Design Studio, Northwestern University
Cecile-Anne Sison is the Instructional Technology Lead of MAD Studio, a Humanities-focused unit of Weinberg College. For over 15 years she has consulted with faculty and taught students on incorporating technology into their classes. During the pandemic, she participated in NUIT’s... Read More →


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Hopin: Poster Session Connections for Research Through a Virtual Platform
Early March is a time when Northwestern University’s Master of Science in Higher Education Administration and Policy (MSHE) program promotes the research progress of its graduate students via a poster session. MSHE’s poster session is typically a highly collaborative in-person experience that creates learning, feedback, and exploration for all who participate. In general, current students in the research sequence, MSHE faculty, other experts, and all the newly admitted prospective students for the next academic year are invited. The need to conduct this event remotely inspired MSHE faculty and staff to design a poster session that maintained, and in some ways enhanced, connections among students, faculty, staff, alumni, admitted students, and higher education practitioners. During winter quarter 2021, MSHE partnered with Norris University Center staff to launch a virtual poster session on Hopin. Hopin is a new but rapidly expanding virtual platform that has improved the MSHE poster session experience. Via recorded video, MSHE captures the technical processes, instructor reflection, student experience, discussion of both academic and non-academic feedback mechanisms, and how virtual platforms like Hopin transform learning and connections in an academic research-sharing environment.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt

Speakers
avatar for Chris Neary

Chris Neary

Instructional Design and Technology Consultant, Northwestern University
Chris Neary is the instructional design and technology consultant for the Master of Science in Higher Education Administration and Policy program at Northwestern University. In his work he channels his higher education experiences while partnering with researcher-practitioners in... Read More →
avatar for Lois Trautvetter

Lois Trautvetter

Director, Higher Education Administration and Policy, Northwestern University
Lois Calian Trautvetter is director of Northwestern University’s Higher Education Administration and Policy Program and professor in the School of Education and Social Policy. Her research interests include faculty and professional development issues such as productivity, enhancing... Read More →
avatar for Amit Prachand

Amit Prachand

Asssociate VP Information and Analytics


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

How Adult Education Can Inform Optimal Online Learning: A Conversation
This video is based on “How Adult Education Can Inform Optimal Online Learning” in “Resilient Pedagogy: Practical Teaching Strategies to Overcome Distance, Disruption, and Distraction,” part of the Utah State University Empower Teaching Open Access Book Series (2021).

The Great Onlining of 2020 is a term used to describe the massive migration of on-ground courses to online learning environments. Simultaneously, the term online learning has become politicized and is now often erroneously assumed to be learning that is inferior. Dr. David S. Noffs and learning designer Krissy Wilson will share a conversation on the ways adult learning theory can inform engaging and effective online learning for all students – adults or otherwise.

After reviewing the differences between emergency remote teaching (ERT) and optimal online learning (OOL), we will review OOL key terms and walk participants through our model for using adult education strategies in online learning environments. In keeping with the conference theme of connections, we will also share OOL strategies from the classes we taught in 2020, connected with quotes from the theorists we cited in our chapter.

After you watch the video, visit our blog post to share your comments! Continue the conversation using the hashtag #ERTtoOOL on Twitter!

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8my

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Wilson

Kristina Wilson

Senior Learning Designer (School of Professional Studies), Northwestern University
Let's chat about universal design for learning, andragogy, and teaching writing! Looking forward to connecting with you!


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

How Can TA Meetings Effectively Prepare TA Instruction, Virtually?
A general chemistry course consists of multiple components, among them recitation and office hour sections. These sections are centered on enhancing students’ conceptual understanding and honing their problem-solving skills, which requires a skillful synthesis of technical and pedagogical planning from TAs. The goal of my pedagogical project is to develop recommendation guidelines for TA recitation meetings to facilitate effective TA instruction, considering an online teaching environment. With the cooperative input of the TAs, the challenging areas of virtual TA instruction were probed. Subsequently, five core objectives related to TA pedagogical and learning needs were determined. Development of resources to aid TAs’ preparation for effective and inclusive instruction has been ongoing. Collectively, the outcomes of the processes have contributed to the composition of structural guidelines in the form of a TA meeting template that will standardize certain instructional expectations and preparation. Altogether, utilizing the collaborative and informative nature of TA meetings to the highest extent provides the tools and support for TAs to make effective instructional decisions that result in enhancing student learning.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8my


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

How to Keep Students Connected to Their Instructors, Their Peers, and the Course Content
The outbreak of the coronavirus created a major disruption to colleges and universities across the country and forced educational institutions to cancel face-to-face classes and move to the online instructional environment. Instructors are recognizing the challenges to keep students engaged and learning when teaching an online class. This presentation will share some techniques that two faculty members used to increase students’ engagement in their online classes. During the first part of the presentation, we will discuss the techniques and the various assignments we use in teaching asynchronous classes to keep students connected to their instructors, their peers, and the course content. In the second part of the presentation, we will demonstrate the techniques we implement in our synchronous classes to keep students engaged in the class and connected. This presentation will discuss a variety of techniques, such as the use of probing questions, polls, breakout rooms, the whiteboard and the writing tool, the chat box, short interactive videos, after-class quizzes, real-world problems, weekly discussion boards, and writing and reflection assignments.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Lab in a Backpack Goes Remote
The "lab in a backpack" method has been used in mechanical and biomedical engineering at Northwestern for 10 years. Students purchase a lab kit for learning electronics and programming during lectures and at home. This method enabled us to continue lab-based education during remote learning, but new challenges were encountered, including kit shipments, effective office hours over video, and assignment submission and evaluation. In this video, I will review the lessons learned for my classes Introduction to Mechatronics, Advanced Mechatronics, and Biomedical Signals and Circuits.


Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Marchuk

Nicholas Marchuk

Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University
Nick manages the Northwestern Mechatronics Design Lab, coordinates the annual McCormick robot Design Competition, advises students on design projects for courses and independent study, oversees the Mechatronics Wiki, and works on curriculum development.


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Learning by Sketching in Environmental Science
Prior studies suggested sketching is effective in improving spatial thinking skills and facilitating solving complex problems. A major challenge in implementing sketching in STEM education is how to capture and assess the changes in students’ knowledge and to enforce the learning, which became more difficult in remote instruction mode. To overcome the challenge, a pilot study was conducted by applying CogSketch, a computer-based sketching platform, to an environmental science course in Fall 2020 to investigate how the CogSketch online system affected students’ learning effectiveness with a more interactive learning environment. Paper-based and CogSketch-based sketching assignments were deployed to test students’ spatial learning and collect their sketching behaviors. Knowledge tests and surveys were used to evaluate students’ course knowledge and to collect feedback. In this session, we focus on introducing the methodology and preliminary findings. This study showed several advantages in improving learning effectiveness by using CogSketch. The interactive and approachable online platform offered easier access and submission in an inclusive environment for all students. CogSketch allowed students to focus on thinking and understanding the concepts and relationships rather than the grade by offering immediate feedback as guidance in practice, which promoted the connection to new knowledge.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8my

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Leveling Up (Student) Engagement in Virtual Classes
In this video, the presenters approach methods of student engagement with a belief that the intellectual community fostered in the classroom deepens when all students contribute. Presenters identify the social and cognitive risks students take when they contribute to class. Presenters will share activity models that warm-up and level-up student engagement from “incognito” to “influencer” and from recall of knowledge to analysis and structural assessment. Presenters help instructors think critically about the different cognitive and social tasks they design for students and how they can calibrate the demands of any activity by adjusting the level of student visibility and the rigor of thinking required. Presenters model how instructors can use positive feedback to generate hype around a word cloud or with layered annotation. The presenters argue that positive feedback from both the instructor and their peers motivates student engagement as the intellectual stakes increase. The goal of these activities is to generate student-to-student connection and discovery.

Speakers
DH

Danielle Holtz

Program Coordinator, Center for Talent Development
avatar for Ruth Doan

Ruth Doan

Summer Program Team Lead -- Grades 9-12, Center for Talent Development
Ask me about developing engaging curricula for high school students.  Ask me about student engagement and staff development online.


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Media Arabic: Teaching Listening Comprehension for Broadcast News Using Online Resources
One of the hardest skills to develop for a language learner is listening to the target language at rapid-fire speed, as is the case in news broadcasts and interviews. In addition to the speed, native speakers use idioms and expressions when talking that do not translate accurately and can only be learned through repetitive usage. I developed a course that teaches listening skills and created an online dictionary that includes expressions and idioms that will help students develop the connections required to be able to understand and interact with online media.

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Promoting Community Dialogues in the Target Languages of Spanish and English
I believe students can learn about other cultures through one-on-one discussion of various topics instead of learning from a book or going to the internet to find information. To improve students' second language skills (Spanish and English), I organized four sessions in which students interact in separate pairs. Each pair contains one student from the Northwestern University course Spanish 121-3: The Secrets of Hispanic Gastronomy: Fusion of Food and Culture and one student from Universidad Torcuato Di Tella in Buenos Aires, Argentina. During these sessions, both groups of students will engage in conversations about given topics. By the time of this presentation, the students will have already met twice, and I will offer a description of the following:

  1. How I build community between groups of students.
  2. What activities I created to accomplish my goals.
  3. How the sessions were set up with the students, including what technological tools were used.
  4. Challenges the students face when learning a new language and being in contact with someone from a new culture.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Reframing Office Hours to Improve Student-Instructor Relationships
Strong relationships between college students and their teachers have an undisputed link to positive student outcomes, such as retention, motivation, sense of belonging, and academic achievement. Office hours present an invaluable space to build such one-on-one connections with instructors outside of the classroom. However, office hours are frequently underutilized, and remote learning has eliminated many opportunities for informal interactions (i.e., pre- or post-class “corridor” discussions), exacerbating the dependency of the student-instructor relationship on office hours. Therefore, an urgent need exists to lower barriers to attendance that may prevent students from forming connections with their instructors. The proposed reframed office hours are designed to be more relaxed and accessible by lowering instructor expectations of student preparedness to join. This approach first seeks to improve the student-instructor relationship as perceived by both students and teachers. Second, it aims to widen the distribution of students’ academic need levels who participate in office hours by minimizing obstacles to help-seeking experienced by those with the greatest need. The resulting connections between students and instructors may inspire future courses to reconsider their office hours strategy, regardless of teaching format.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt

Speakers
ES

Emily Schafer

PhD Candidate in Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Singing a Building: Teaching Music Through Architecture and Photography
Based upon my Residential College Tutorial, “Singing a Building: Making Connections between Music and Architecture,” this presentation demonstrates how one’s avocations can enhance and become a part of one’s vocation. Although I am a career musician, my passions for photography and for giving Chicago River architecture tours have not only given me great joy but also become a vital part of my piano teaching. I will discuss how I use photographic imagery and architectural references to enhance my teaching and give students a general framework from which they can appreciate all the arts.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8my

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Teaching Students to Execute an AI Solution
In this session, we introduce how students are taught to solve a business AI use case in our class. Our approach is an immersive, hands-on course focused on solving a real-world business-marketing problem by working with large data sets and applying AI solutions. Students work as a consultative team to develop key performance indicators to understand a retailer’s challenges and develop solutions. This includes an analysis of retailer transaction data, as well as syndicated research and government-supplied data. The course helps students learn how to analyze and frame business-marketing issues; manage and fuse large data sets and prepare them for exploratory analysis; and build and document executable AI models. Connections are fostered by actively engaging with the retailer, as students have weekly meetings with the client as well as two formal client presentations during the quarter.


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Technology and Intercultural Communication
How can intercultural communication or collaboration with native speakers from other countries benefit your program? As foreign language instructors at Northwestern University (NU), we aim to offer our students opportunities for interpersonal communication with fluent native speakers of the language. Projects mediated by technology have facilitated the communication between our students and speakers around the world.

In this session, we will present three different projects:

1) NU Portuguese second-year language students have interacted with college students in Brazil in a Facebook group, where they mutually shared media of their interest and other daily activities, and on Zoom, where, every other week, they were paired up for a general topic conversation.

2) NU intermediate Spanish students studying human rights and social justice have connected via Skype or Zoom to student leaders of indigenous rights, NGOs, and the LGBTQ+ communities in Guatemala to understand and involve themselves in the struggles of these marginalized populations.

3) NU advanced Arabic students have interacted with Sorbonne-Nouvelle University (Paris 3) students and have utilized Zoom, Google Meet, Canvas discussions, and VoiceThread web cloud to promote peer collaboration by working together on creating digital stories that fostered deeper interpersonal relationships and enhanced intercultural competency.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

The Potential and Perils of Teaching with Augmented Reality
Augmented reality (AR) is reshaping how people work and learn. Physicians can practice performing surgeries. First responders can simulate how to react to situations that are extraordinarily dangerous or infrequent. With this as context, in this presentation we will introduce some of the augmented technologies that can enable experiences that would be impossible or out of reach in a traditional learning environment. This session will introduce the meaning and history of this technology as well as the design principles to leverage the potential and avoid the perils. When teaching in new environments, there are novel pedagogical considerations. With the use of a technology that by its very nature augments the concept of reality, there are ethical considerations as well. There are also implications for how it will change the way we connect in traditional physical environments and virtually. In addition to exploring these topics, we will share examples of coursework being done in immersive environments, review logistics, and shine a light on how AR content gets created.

Speakers
KP

Ken Panko

Director, Media & Technology Innovation, Northwestern University
avatar for Rodolfo Vieira

Rodolfo Vieira

Developer Lead, Northwestern IT Media & Technology Innovation


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

The Virtual Chautauqua: Experimental and Nonsequential Course Navigation
During the design of Communication Studies 294, Our Relationships, Our Selves, subject-matter expert Jen Baker and learning designer David Noffs developed a process unique from the traditional course design method. The two met during multiple development sessions and employed storytelling techniques to create a nonsequential course architecture.

Using the “hero’s journey” from mythology, as well as Chautauquas, they created a template for overarching course navigation – with extrapolated topics and themes from previous iterations of the course. Their result included: multiple points of entry through which the students could enter the course activities (called chapters); students creating their weekly learning objectives; and students gathering as a whole in the virtual Chautauqua tent at the end of each chapter. In the context of online learning, the Chautauqua tent is a metaphor for the completion of specific course learning objectives.

Having the ability to multi-thread discussions and allow for informal group gatherings and discussions as a way of working together toward course goals (the Chautauqua tent) could liberate both teachers and students from otherwise sequential and predictable course design.

This video showcases their method and finalized course, as well as explores how this method could work in any course design process.

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731

12:00pm CDT

Using UDL to Increase Accessibility and Engagement in Asynchronous Learning
As we moved from in-person instruction to emergency remote teaching in March 2020, many instructors wondered how to engage their students in synchronous online lectures. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework helped instructors structure their sessions with empathy and variety. As time went on, more instructors became comfortable with developing and facilitating asynchronous online learning activities.

In this video, learning designers Angela Xiong and Krissy Wilson will share new strategies for engaging students in asynchronous components of your online course, informed by UDL. Reduce barriers, provide opportunities for diverse expression and student agency, assist with goal-setting, increase motivation, and see more equitable student success.

After you watch the video, continue the conversation with us using the hashtag #UDL_Asynch on Twitter!

Be sure to join the Office Hours discussion for this video on Thursday morning. Find more information on that session here: https://teachx21.sched.com/event/j8mt

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Wilson

Kristina Wilson

Senior Learning Designer (School of Professional Studies), Northwestern University
Let's chat about universal design for learning, andragogy, and teaching writing! Looking forward to connecting with you!
avatar for Angela Xiong

Angela Xiong

Learning Designer, School of Professional Studies, Northwestern University
I truly feel passionate about creating an engaging learner-centered environment to teach and help people learn.  From my early career as an English teacher in Beijing, China to my role as a learning designer in the U.S., I am an advocate for constructivist learning, backward design... Read More →


Monday May 10, 2021 12:00pm - Thursday May 13, 2021 4:00pm CDT
Canvas https://canvas.northwestern.edu/courses/144731
 
Tuesday, May 11
 

10:00am CDT

Higher Education's Humanity Crisis
Higher education faced unforeseen challenge after challenge in 2020, including COVID-19, racial reckoning, and a mental health crisis. From the many hard lessons experienced comes an urgent call to center a human-first approach and imbue the processes, procedures, and traditions in higher education with radical empathy. Drawing from trauma-informed pedagogical principles, this keynote argues for the humanization of academia, framing it as a social justice issue and particularly consequential for marginalized communities. Together, we will discuss how progress is possible through alternative frameworks and ways of knowing.

Speakers
avatar for Jasmine Roberts

Jasmine Roberts

Lecturer, The Ohio State University
Jasmine Roberts is an educator, speaker, writer, and strategic communication professional. She teaches courses on communication campaigns and strategic communication writing at The Ohio State University. Roberts’ advocacy work centers on the experiences of people of color, women, and queer communities... Read More →


Tuesday May 11, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am CDT
Zoom Webinar 3 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99788424616

11:15am CDT

Using Structured Student Interaction to Enhance Student Performance
Human connection and interaction are cornerstones of the physical therapy curriculum. Our courses have a blend of lecture and lab formats that fosters physical and emotional connections amongst the students. Historically, students in our physiology lecture course find great benefit from study groups formed because of these relationships. This opportunity is now hindered by our present restrictions on socialization beyond the cohorts of eight students per pod.

In developing my physiology course, I sought to best find this magic in a purely online format for my lecture course. The course design sought to offer a network that both supports and develops the students' knowledge. My design embedded opportunities for student-to-student engagement to apply the evidenced benefits of small-group learning and extend their connections to the whole class. These opportunities came in the form of independently completed quizzes, followed by group collaboration to reflect on the rationale for each answer. Synchronous sessions offered breakout groups to apply knowledge in the form of patient cases.

Course results demonstrate an improved class average for the first two exams, compared to the previous three years. It is a work in progress – real progress.

This session is being sponsored by Ed Discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Ryan, PT, DPT, MS, CCS

Jennifer Ryan, PT, DPT, MS, CCS

Assistant Professor, Northwestern University, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences
Jennifer Marie Ryan, PT, DPT, MS is a Board Certified Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Clinical Specialist and Assistant Professor at Northwestern University Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences. She teaches in the cardiovascular and pulmonary curriculum, physiology... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Ed Discussion

Ed Discussion

Ed Discussion helps instructors save time and scale course communication and student Q&A through a beautiful and intuitive interface. Questions reach and benefit the whole class. Students and staff can better express ideas and post math, runnable code, image annotations and beyond... Read More →


Tuesday May 11, 2021 11:15am - 12:00pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

11:15am CDT

Lessons on Inclusive STEM Teaching Project Northwestern Learning Community
Becoming an inclusive educator takes more than simply implementing strategies or best practices; it requires a deep understanding of the challenges learners face and how instructors can actively support them (Danowitz & Tuitt, 2011). The Inclusive STEM Teaching Project is an NSF-sponsored massive open online course that advances the awareness, the self-efficacy, and the ability of faculty, doctoral students, and postdocs to cultivate inclusive STEM learning environments for all their students and to develop themselves as reflective, inclusive practitioners. Local learning communities met weekly to deepen and reinforce the learning they began through interaction with asynchronous online content. We used active listening techniques and incorporated the larger social-cultural-political events that were going on in the U.S. and on our campus into our sessions. Attendees demonstrated a shared sense of ethical responsibility and inclusive teaching competence among the community members to both understand and counter messages and structures from our own institution and higher education in STEM that threaten the sense of belonging among our students of color. In this session, the panelists will reflect on how the Northwestern team cultivated connectedness in our virtual learning community while supporting personal growth. We will discuss and answer questions regarding this socially conscious blended learning model.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Womack

Veronica Womack

I love to talk about inclusive teaching, social justice, and mindfulness!


Tuesday May 11, 2021 11:15am - 12:00pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

1:00pm CDT

Finding a PATH to Success: Achieving Peak Performance Through Well-Being
Even before COVID-19, it was clear to us how many of our students knew what to do to achieve academic success, even though they weren’t doing it. Add a global pandemic and barriers to peak performance have never been greater. The best way to address these barriers is connection: Better connection to ourselves and others is the challenge we all face. PATH teaches the connection between how we think (psychology), how we feel (biology), and what we do (strategy), along with how these three drivers of our performance determine what we can achieve.

Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering created PATH as both an online curriculum and a facilitated group forum to teach students how to cultivate the intentional attention, accurate awareness, and heathy connection necessary for optimizing their performance. In this presentation, we will share the powerful results this program has had on both academic performance and overall student empowerment and well-being.

“Honestly, every topic was very useful and interesting… PATH showed me there is still a ton to learn. Reflection on every bit of new material was actually very helpful and allowed me to reevaluate my habits and start changing them step by step.” - PATH Participant, Fall 2020

Speakers
JH

Joe Holtgreive

Assistant Dean, Director, Engineering Office of Personal Development, Northwestern University


Tuesday May 11, 2021 1:00pm - 1:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

1:00pm CDT

Pedagogy of Hypermobility: Education, Connection, and Communities
What do educators need to know about pedagogical strategies with applications (apps)? "Today, 37 percent of U.S. adults say they mostly use a smartphone when accessing the internet" (Anderson, 2019). It is important to highlight to understand the potential of mobile and ubiquitous communication. How did those technological events merge into our culture and invite us to think over education? We reflect on the current pedagogical models, including continuous and seamless learning, collaborative learning, with mobile and hypermediatic curricula, supported by interactivity and diversity. Hypermobility (Santaella, 2007) is the union of physical space, mobile connection, and digital information. Thus, pedagogy for hypermobility reflects upon teaching in movement and connection in education, especially with a focus on pedagogical processes without walls, where education has no borders. The proposal is to create an environment of mobile teaching-learning, using apps as a pedagogic strategy: peer communities, authorship, interactive learning, educational assessment, and engaging the class in production of content in the age of connectivity and hypermobility. Teachers are rethinking a proper pedagogy for contemporary society, especially in remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Come learn strategies to improve your online classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Vivian Martins

Vivian Martins

Professor, Federal Institute of Rio de Janeiro
Vivian Martins is a doctoral candidate in Education from the State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Brazil. She received both a BA in Pedagogy and a MA in Education from the State University of Rio de Janeiro. She specializes in planning, implementation and management of distance... Read More →


Tuesday May 11, 2021 1:00pm - 1:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

1:00pm CDT

Learning on the Edge: Accessing the Classroom Experience from Anywhere
Workshop sponsors: AVI-SPL and Sony

Please note, workshops require additional registration. See the workshop's Eventbrite listing for more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/learning-on-the-edge-accessing-the-classroom-experience-from-anywhere-tickets-151855282237

In this workshop, we’ll creatively and collectively apply leading-edge AI-based technology to solve the challenge of virtually transporting the classroom experience to any student anywhere. Learn what tech is available to ensure all students see and hear the content in real-time – whether a chemistry lab in action, detailed physics equations on a whiteboard, or a dynamic lesson where the instructor moves through a variety of media. No matter whether you are teaching online, in the classroom, or in a hybrid teaching scenario, we understand the pedagogy should be enhanced by technology, not controlled by it.

Speakers
BC

Ben Cano

Senior B2B Account Manager, Sony Professional
CS

Chrissy Sara

Sales Support Engineer, Sony Professional
EH

Ellen Hickson

Director, Field Marketing, AVI-SPL

Sponsors
avatar for AVI-SPL & Sony

AVI-SPL & Sony

AVI-SPL and Sony work together to provide revolutionary AV solutions to improve digital connections in the workplace.


Tuesday May 11, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room Link to join included in the Eventbrite reminder email.

1:00pm CDT

Equitable Writing Assessment
Please note, workshops require additional registration. See the workshop's Eventbrite listing for more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/equitable-writing-assessment-tickets-151846160955

Grades have been proven to harm students’ learning. Recent scholarship demonstrates that grades are not an accurate measure of learning, do not communicate meaningful information about learning, do not motivate learning, and can inflict psychological harm. Perhaps even more importantly, the literature shows that grades-based assessment practices can uphold and even perpetuate systemic racism and white language supremacy as well as monolingual ideologies.

This workshop will engage participants in applying best practices for equitable writing assessment to their syllabi and assignments. We will survey current theories, methods, and strategies for incorporating more equitable assessment practices into participants’ curricula, and we will present examples of nonstandard assessment methods that we have used in our College Seminars within Northwestern University’s Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences (WCAS). We will focus especially on the ways that alternative assessment strategies can foster important connections between students and instructors, ultimately offering a more personal and individualized mode of instruction that supports all students. In the context of WCAS College Seminars, we find that more equitable modes of assessment help incoming first years more meaningfully connect to the scholarly community at Northwestern and to college life more broadly.

We encourage participants to bring syllabi, assignments, rubrics, and/or other course materials for reflection during the workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Meaghan Fritz

Meaghan Fritz

Assistant Professor of Instruction, The Cook Family Writing Program, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences
Meaghan Fritz received her PhD in English in 2018 from Northwestern University, where she specialized in nineteenth-century American women’s literature. She teaches College Seminars, First-Year Writing Seminars, Practical Rhetoric, and Writing and Speaking in Business in the Weinberg... Read More →
LD

Lisa Del Torto

Associate Professor of Instruction, Northwestern University


Tuesday May 11, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room Link to join included in the Eventbrite reminder email.

2:00pm CDT

Intercultural Online Collaboration: Hip-Hop in Oneonta, N.Y., and Cali, Colombia
Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) provides the opportunity to work with students internationally through an online platform. In 2019, SUNY Oneonta professors worked with ICESI University in Cali, Colombia, to create an international collaborative learning experience. This presentation will explore the process of creating a COIL project between a hip-hop cultures course and an English language class, including the challenges and analysis of intercultural awareness. The project aimed to encourage students to critically examine hip-hop culture from various perspectives through a detailed plan where they had collaborative activities, constant interaction in Edmodo, and co-creation of tasks. We will present and ask participants to work with Edmodo to experience and practice collaboration using this tool. We found that while collaboration did not happen naturally among students using Edmodo and various other tools, students managed to open themselves up to new perspectives, ideas, and levels of communication.


Tuesday May 11, 2021 2:00pm - 2:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

2:00pm CDT

Connecting with Empathy: Giving Hope to Our Students and Ourselves
The pandemic has traumatized all students and faculty, some much more than others. Instructors should teach with empathy to connect with these students. Teaching with empathy lets instructors do more than just teach the subject matter and skills our universities hired us to teach. It also allows us to impart hope. To address this urgent need, this session will demonstrate how to apply the principles of trauma-informed pedagogy to establish trust between students and instructor, build an in-class community, and build students’ resilience.

Participants will hear from an instructor who used trauma-informed pedagogy to connect with her students in a fully online Northwestern law school course in the Fall 2020 semester, as well as a student from that class. The instructor will offer practical guidance for teaching with empathy and offer some ideas for how to manage the emotional labor required to do so. Participants will also hear from a neuroscientist and teaching expert on what neuroscience research tells us about what happens when we impart hope to others.

Speakers
avatar for Clare Willis

Clare Willis

Research & Instructional Services Librarian, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
Clare Gaynor Willis is the Research & Instructional Services Librarian at the Pritzker Legal Research Center, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law.
avatar for Mays Imad

Mays Imad

Coordinator of Teaching & Learning Center, Pima Community College
Mays Imad serves as a Professor of Genetics, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Pima Community College as well as the founding coordinator of the Teaching and Learning Center. Mays received her undergraduate training in Philosophy from the University of Michigan, focusing on Philosophy... Read More →



Tuesday May 11, 2021 2:00pm - 2:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

3:00pm CDT

Birds of a Feather: Inclusion, Access, and Social Justice
A closed, topical discussion only for members of the Northwestern community.

Speakers
MM

Michael Mazzeo

Associate Professor of Strategy, Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University


Tuesday May 11, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 2 By invitation only.

3:00pm CDT

Birds of a Feather: Practicum Alumni
A closed, topical discussion only for members of the Northwestern community.

Speakers
avatar for Reba-Anna Lee

Reba-Anna Lee

Assistant Dean of Distance Learning


Tuesday May 11, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 2 By invitation only.
 
Wednesday, May 12
 

10:00am CDT

Student Engagement Approaches in Hybrid Laboratory Education
What methods can a lab course, where learning is inherently in-person, implement to fit a hybrid structure while maintaining and delivering learning objectives? In this session, we will share our experiences and pedagogical methods for redesigning a graduate lab course for hybrid delivery, as well as strategies to preserve core competencies and create engagement opportunities for remote and in-person students. Additionally, we will provide blueprints to reimagine course delivery, metrics for student success, and a framework to collect and respond to student feedback. Finally, we will conclude with lessons learned and present recommendations for post-pandemic instructional methodologies.

This session is being sponsored by Crowdmark

Speakers
Sponsors
avatar for Crowdmark

Crowdmark

Crowdmark is an online collaborative grading platform that enables educators to evaluate student work more effectively.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 10:00am - 10:45am CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

10:00am CDT

Connection Through Open Educational Resources
Open educational resources (OER) are free, openly licensed teaching and learning materials that lower barriers to access and learning. This panel will discuss an ongoing collaboration among the Cook Family Writing Program (Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences), McCormick School of Engineering, and the Libraries to create, adapt, and implement OER in Design Thinking & Communication, a required undergraduate course. With support from Northwestern’s Affordable Instructional Resources Initiative, this collaboration reduces course costs and lowers gatekeeping around who may author and who may benefit from expertise.

Panelists will provide an overview of our OER initiative and reflect on our experiences with OER. We will discuss the implementation of OER within the context of a course for which over 30 faculty and 500 students share a common syllabus across 60 annual sections. Librarians will discuss support available for OER and how OER can be published by the Northwestern Libraries. We will outline next steps in the initiative, which we consider an iterative, dynamic process of teaching and learning that represents a variety of voices.

Attendees will engage in short activities that consider their course materials, and they will be welcome to ask questions throughout the session. We hope that learning about our experiences will empower participants to develop and work with OER.

This session is being sponsored by Atlas Systems.

Speakers
LD

Lisa Del Torto

Associate Professor of Instruction, Northwestern University
KK

Kaara Kallen

Instructor, Design Thinking and Communication, Northwestern University
I am an instructor of Design Thinking and Communication at Northwestern and a content consultant for for-purpose and educational organizations.

Sponsors
avatar for Atlas Systems

Atlas Systems

Atlas Systems partners with libraries, archives, museums, and information repositories of all kinds to facilitate and promote collection visibility and access.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 10:00am - 10:45am CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

10:00am CDT

Integrate an Online Whiteboard into Remote or Blended Courses
Workshop sponsor: Miro

Please note, workshops require additional registration. See the workshop's Eventbrite listing for more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/integrate-an-online-whiteboard-into-remote-or-blended-courses-tickets-151858002373

In this workshop, you will learn how to replicate the offline experience and transform the online learning process to make it more engaging, effective, and collaborative. You will be able to pick the topic you like – before, during, and between classes. Learn best practices from other universities and join small breakout rooms to comfortably practice new skills or ask questions.

About Miro: Miro is a collaborative online whiteboard trusted by over 15 million users worldwide, including users from Berkeley, MIT, Stanford, and Cornell. It's been supporting education since 2012, and it is now providing a range of special offers for teachers, students, and universities.

Speakers
LO

Lina Ochman

Commercial Sales Leader, Miro
TM

Troy Mielke

EDU Sales Manager, Miro
NN

Natalie Nedre

EDU and NPO Programs Manager, Miro

Sponsors
avatar for Miro

Miro

Miro is the online collaborative whiteboard platform.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 10:00am - 11:30am CDT
Zoom Meeting Room Link to join included in the Eventbrite reminder email.

10:00am CDT

Case-Based Ultrasound Teaching: Anatomy, Physiology, and Reasoning
Please note, workshops require additional registration. See the workshop's Eventbrite listing for more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/case-based-ultrasound-teaching-anatomy-physiology-and-reasoning-tickets-151850239153

This session will highlight how concepts in anatomy, physiology, and medical decision making have been combined in a case-based, virtual interactive format. This format was created given the need for virtual instruction for Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine students. The learners will be presented with a series of ultrasound images, downloadable files for group work, and specific questions. The groups are brought together and discuss interpretations and answers to questions to identify disease conditions and patient decision making.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 10:00am - 11:30am CDT
Zoom Meeting Room Link to join included in the Eventbrite reminder email.

11:00am CDT

Teaching Communities of Practice to Support Educator Connections
This interactive skill-building workshop will introduce evaluation, critical adult education, and Communities of Practice (CoPs) and demonstrate their application as a methodology to interrogate, evaluate, and improve one’s teaching practice. Over the last year, 1 million instructors in higher education in the United States have faced upheaval in their instructional practice. Since the onset of the pandemic, all have taught online, whereas fewer than 20 percent had previously; 10 times the number of faculty have sought engaged professional development in teaching than typically occurs in a year; the majority have incorporated asynchronous online learning as well as multiple educational technologies; and many have reflected on their students’ learning and grown from their feedback. We will explore how CoPs have spontaneously emerged at Northwestern to support this transition. CoPs engage learners in a process of knowledge construction, unlearning/relearning around common interests, ideas, passions, and goals. Through identifying the three core CoP elements (domain, community, practice), members generate a shared, accessible repertoire of knowledge and resources. By capitalizing on the connections and community of shared faculty experiences, creation of common values and approaches to instructional practice, and mutual recognition, support, and affirmation, sustained culture change in higher education can occur.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 11:00am - 11:45am CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

11:00am CDT

Traveling to Inexperienced Realms: Immersive Reality for Classroom Learning
Can immersive reality provide dimensional learning to enhance understanding of concepts or expand upon creative ideas? How do faculty explore immersive experiences with their students? Discover the academic potential of immersive experiences via implemented use cases with the focus on 360-degree video, 360-degree imagery tours, and immersive reality in a remote context. Explore a variety of undergraduate STEAM course examples. Follow the thought and creation process of a biology project that created 360-degree videos of geographical climates. Through immersive experiences, students can connect with instructional material in a way they would not have been able to otherwise, as well as experience global locations in the time of the pandemic.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Kuntz

Amy Kuntz

Instructional Designer, Penn State
Amy Kuntz is as Instructional Designer within Teaching and Learning with Technology (TLT) at Penn State University and adjunct instructor at Northampton Community College. Her main role is to partner with faculty in a consultative manner and as part of intensive course redesign projects... Read More →
avatar for Eileen Grodziak

Eileen Grodziak

Instructional Designer, The Pennsylvania State University
avatar for Kate Morgan

Kate Morgan

Director of Virtual Education, Penn State Lehigh Valley
Continually curious with a lot of energy for teaching with technology and education in the 21st century.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 11:00am - 11:45am CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

1:00pm CDT

Connect, Teach, Study, and Collaborate with the OneNote Class Notebook
Remote instruction has made sharing materials inside and outside the classroom an easier and indispensable practice. Instructors learned how to use virtual whiteboards, screen share handouts and PowerPoints, mark up texts and images in real time, create pages and modules in Canvas, and so on. Yet, many of us still wrestle with the technical and practical difficulties posed by the need to switch applications during a sharing session and the challenge of making all the materials that we share stick together. Unsurprisingly, students have expressed frustration with the number of platforms over which their remote instruction is taking place – too many things in too many places.

This presentation demonstrates how instructors can use OneNote Class Notebook to design and run engaging class sessions in a single connected workspace where different kinds of materials can be uploaded, organized, and annotated. Moreover, this session covers the use of a new Canvas Class Notebook feature to create a living notebook where in-class notes are saved and can be reviewed by students 24/7. Tips for review can be included to guide students even when the instructor is not present. Additionally, collaborative features give students a virtual space where they can connect and work together.

Speakers
FT

Francesca Tataranni

Professor of Instruction, Classics, Northwestern University


Wednesday May 12, 2021 1:00pm - 1:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

1:00pm CDT

Transitional Learning Environments: Connecting Strategy to the Operational
In this presentation, we use experiences and feedback garnered from staff and faculty at a large Midwestern regional higher education institution as a case study. We document some of the complexities, challenges, and opportunities faced by regional higher educational institutions in the United States as they seek to navigate and transform their place-based institutions into hybrid, digitally focused entities. We share factors that were encountered at our institution in switching and adapting teaching and learning operations from a face-to-face approach to one that is primarily blended and hybrid in the short term, as enforced by the COVID-19 pandemic, and in the long term as we balance the physical learning space portfolio between a digital and place-based learning environment across different disciplines and pedagogical styles. Factors encountered included technology adoption and use challenges, along with connecting distributed and independent faculty technology support for space- and place-based academic activities to the digital support ecosystem available at the enterprise level. Other factors that showed up included financial pressures, in addition to the policy and strategic environments of the institution as aligned with those of individual colleges that guide and affect operational activities in the transition from a place-based, space-bound entity to a hybrid entity.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 1:00pm - 1:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

1:00pm CDT

Doubling Down with Educational Technology: Filling in the Gaps with PeerWise and Quizlet Live
Please note, workshops require additional registration. See the workshop's Eventbrite listing for more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/doubling-down-with-educational-technology-tickets-151832108925

How can we engage our students in online, hybrid, and traditional classroom settings...and what about balancing the introverts and extroverts? In this session, attendees will explore integrative student learning, beginning with the instructor's use of fillable and interactive lectures for the foundation. Current students enrolled in online education have reported that interactive lecture content keeps them engaged, and they also report feeling more prepared for examinations. Following the lecture, students then begin to collaborate, starting with PeerWise and culminating in Quizlet Live to create an environment of learning synthesis and identify areas of improvement. In this interactive session, attendees will be able to see how the interactive lectures are created, try creating their own PeerWise questions, and use Quizlet Live.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room Link to join included in the Eventbrite reminder email.

2:00pm CDT

The Art of the Zoom Room: Building Online Collaborative Communities
With online teaching becoming very much the norm, we need to rethink the ways in which we build meaningful connections between our students, especially in discussion-based classrooms. This session will delve into strategies, struggles, and success stories, all revolving around the Zoom room. This tool allows educators to break students into smaller online discussion groups but limits our ability to supervise more than one group at a time. In this session, we will problem-solve around increasing student engagement and accountability while they are working in these smaller groups.

Speakers
avatar for Leah Barsanti

Leah Barsanti

Professor of English, East-West University
My name is Leah Roth Barsanti, and I am an arts educator in the city of Chicago with and MFA from Northwestern University and a BA from Washington University. Currently, I teach students of all levels, from middle school to higher education, though my primary employment is at East-West... Read More →



Wednesday May 12, 2021 2:00pm - 2:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

2:00pm CDT

Strategies for Teaching the Writing Workshop On-Ground and Online
This panel will focus on strategies for teaching the writing workshop in an on-ground, online, or hybrid format. We'll discuss techniques we've used to keep students engaged and productive and how we've worked around the challenges of the remote or asynchronous graduate writing workshop. Workshops by their nature generally favor in-person instruction and weekly contact that is as much social as pedagogical in nature.

We'll also touch on how more traditional, lecture-based courses both resemble and differ from workshop courses and will suggest methods instructors might use to begin a classroom session regardless of the subject matter or lecture-based course structure.

Lastly, we'll address strategies for overcoming challenges that can arise with Zoom workshop discussions and asynchronous critiques.


Wednesday May 12, 2021 2:00pm - 2:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

3:00pm CDT

Birds of a Feather: Active Learning Community
A closed, topical discussion only for members of the Northwestern community.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Diehl

Jonathan Diehl

Senior Blended Learning Specialist, Northwestern University


Wednesday May 12, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 2 By invitation only.

3:00pm CDT

Birds of a Feather: Graduate Student Instructors
A closed, topical discussion only for members of the Northwestern community.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Ruggeri

Nancy Ruggeri

Northwestern University


Wednesday May 12, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 2 By invitation only.

3:00pm CDT

Birds of a Feather: Learning Design Community
A closed, topical discussion only for members of the Northwestern community.

Speakers
avatar for Bryan Libbin

Bryan Libbin

Interim Sr. Director of Academic Technology, School of Communication, Northwestern University
avatar for Kristina Wilson

Kristina Wilson

Senior Learning Designer (School of Professional Studies), Northwestern University
Let's chat about universal design for learning, andragogy, and teaching writing! Looking forward to connecting with you!


Wednesday May 12, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 2 By invitation only.

3:00pm CDT

Birds of a Feather: Weinberg COPE
A closed, topical discussion only for members of the Northwestern community.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Taylor

Matthew Taylor

IT Director, Media and Design Studio, Northwestern University


Wednesday May 12, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 2 By invitation only.

4:00pm CDT

Presenter Happy Hour
Do you have a favorite phrase? Are you ready to return to the office? Are you now a "Zoombie?" Did you get a pandemic pet? If you answered yes to one or more of these questions, join us at the TEACHx Presenters Happy Hour. We will share the highlights and lowlights of the past 14 months and offer you a chance to celebrate your TEACHx contributions with fellow presenters.

Speakers
avatar for Reba-Anna Lee

Reba-Anna Lee

Assistant Dean of Distance Learning


Wednesday May 12, 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 2 By invitation only.
 
Thursday, May 13
 

10:00am CDT

Differentiated Instruction as a Way to Achieve Educational Equity
Students come to universities with various backgrounds and different levels of preparation for learning. Those with limited educational attainment often struggle in the typical one-size-fits-all university curriculum. Differentiated instruction (DI) has been shown to help younger students with varying skill levels achieve learning goals but has not been applied broadly in higher education. This session will discuss where, when, and how DI can best be used to promote more equitable outcomes in the college classroom without taking on substantial additional effort. Participants will explore practical tips for differentiating instruction in terms of content, process, product, and environment, and they will develop their own strategies for infusing DI into current classroom practices. The session will include examples, case studies, self-assessment tools and additional resources.

Speakers


Thursday May 13, 2021 10:00am - 10:45am CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

10:00am CDT

Global Partnerships: Collaborative Teaching in a Virtual Framework
Due to COVID-19, Northwestern University’s Global Learning Office (GLO) has pivoted its Global Engagement Studies Institute (GESI) program to a virtual framework that builds upon a tradition of hands-on, critical, community-based learning. By doing so, GLO was able to replace lost opportunities for students; prioritize equity of access to global learning experiences; and maintain continuity in its international partnerships. “Virtual GESI” offers students a critical skill set for our emerging global reality through online coursework and remote internships with nonprofit organizations in various countries. In addition, the course utilizes a flipped classroom approach, involving weekly activities, such as simulations and role-plays, to foster critical thinking, identity exploration, team-building, and ethical stakeholder engagement. The program brings together students from multiple campuses, countries, and disciplines to analyze and participate in development contexts from a global perspective. This panel presentation will share key takeaways from an inclusive pedagogy, collaborative teaching and learning model, among other innovations leveraged using technology to create a community of students, faculty, and site partners from around the world at a critical time. The panel will include representatives from across GESI’s multilayered educational partnerships, including faculty, staff, peer facilitator, site director, and host organization supervisor.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Eccles

Patrick Eccles

Associate Director, Global Engagement Programs, Buffett Institute for Global Studies, Northwestern University


Thursday May 13, 2021 10:00am - 10:45am CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

10:00am CDT

Office Hours Discussion - 10 a.m. Session

Speakers
JM

Jay McGoodwin

Study.Net
avatar for Angela Xiong

Angela Xiong

Learning Designer, School of Professional Studies, Northwestern University
I truly feel passionate about creating an engaging learner-centered environment to teach and help people learn.  From my early career as an English teacher in Beijing, China to my role as a learning designer in the U.S., I am an advocate for constructivist learning, backward design... Read More →
avatar for Kristina Wilson

Kristina Wilson

Senior Learning Designer (School of Professional Studies), Northwestern University
Let's chat about universal design for learning, andragogy, and teaching writing! Looking forward to connecting with you!
avatar for Lois Trautvetter

Lois Trautvetter

Director, Higher Education Administration and Policy, Northwestern University
Lois Calian Trautvetter is director of Northwestern University’s Higher Education Administration and Policy Program and professor in the School of Education and Social Policy. Her research interests include faculty and professional development issues such as productivity, enhancing... Read More →
avatar for Chris Neary

Chris Neary

Instructional Design and Technology Consultant, Northwestern University
Chris Neary is the instructional design and technology consultant for the Master of Science in Higher Education Administration and Policy program at Northwestern University. In his work he channels his higher education experiences while partnering with researcher-practitioners in... Read More →
avatar for Alia Lancaster

Alia Lancaster

Senior Research and Assessment Analyst, University of Maryland
As a Senior Research and Assessment Analyst, Dr. Lancaster conducts research, analysis, and evaluations to to characterize and assess the user experience of students, faculty, and staff with academic technology services and tools. In order to provide action-oriented insights to the... Read More →
avatar for Martyn Clark

Martyn Clark

Data Scientist, University of Maryland
I am a Data Scientist with the Academic Technology Experience group at the University of Maryland's Division of Information Technology. I received my PhD from the University of Hawaii and have previously worked as a researcher, proficiency test developer, and English as a Second Language... Read More →
avatar for Amit Prachand

Amit Prachand

Asssociate VP Information and Analytics
avatar for Maya Fein

Maya Fein

Assistant Professor of Theatre, Professor at Wofford College
Maya joined the Theatre faculty at Wofford College as an Assistant Professor in 2020. She serves as an educator, production manager, and lighting designer within the department. She also continues to be a freelance designer and Argentine Tango instructor across the country.Originally... Read More →
ES

Emily Schafer

PhD Candidate in Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University
avatar for Alexander Tchekhovskoy

Alexander Tchekhovskoy

Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University


Thursday May 13, 2021 10:00am - 11:00am CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/97895163060

11:00am CDT

Using Video Game Elements to Increase Student Engagement and Retention
Since more college courses have been delivered virtually, the issue of student engagement and connection has become more apparent. Sitting in front of a computer screen being educated is tedious. One exception to this is playing video games. Gamers can be hard to break away from their computer screens.

This session will describe an experiment integrating course material into interactive stories using video game techniques.

Most students are already familiar with video games. Many elementary schools use games to teach reading and arithmetic. However, there are few video games used for teaching in college. The games are built on interactive stories supplemented with video-gaming elements such as color graphics, sound, motion, time pressure, dynamic scoring, and real-time feedback. They can be played multiple times. A fall trial in an organizational behavior course demonstrated the value of using these tools in connecting with students while identifying the challenges of creating the games.

Today, creating these games requires significant customization. It is likely that in the future more robust platforms will be available, reducing the investment needed to prepare this type of an educational game.


Thursday May 13, 2021 11:00am - 11:45am CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

11:00am CDT

Moving Within the White Canonical Framework: Fostering Diverse Connections
To enact antiracist teaching, we must carefully examine the texts we teach and the ways we teach them. The use of culturally sustaining pedagogies that affirm and empower students of color and disrupt traditional curriculum for White students is a starting point for change. Based on our experiences teaching in culturally and linguistically diverse 9th-grade classrooms in New York City, a teacher and a pre-service teacher share our experiences using a White canonical text, “Animal Farm,” and how we include diversity of texts to support culturally sustaining pedagogies. We highlight our use of texts representing marginalized perspectives to push back on dominant social narratives, including whiteness, patriarchy, and heteronormativity in digital spaces.

Through examining real examples of students’ conversations, personal writing, and assessment products, attendees will have the opportunity to discuss how each of us and all of us can navigate the canonical framework in relation to our own contexts and the students that we teach. Multiple media including pertinent instructional materials and resources, relevant common core learning standards, classroom artifacts, suggested text lists, and student reflections will be used to complement this conversation on inquiry as part of our ELA curriculums.


Thursday May 13, 2021 11:00am - 11:45am CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

11:00am CDT

Office Hours Discussion - 11 a.m. Session

Speakers
BC

Bill Cook

WolfVision
avatar for Cecile-Anne Sison

Cecile-Anne Sison

Instructional Technology Lead, Media and Design Studio, Northwestern University
Cecile-Anne Sison is the Instructional Technology Lead of MAD Studio, a Humanities-focused unit of Weinberg College. For over 15 years she has consulted with faculty and taught students on incorporating technology into their classes. During the pandemic, she participated in NUIT’s... Read More →
avatar for Sally Taylor

Sally Taylor

Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine
I currently serve as Associate Director, Flex Staff, Interpreter Services, Wheelchair & Seating Center at the Shirley Ryan Abilitylab, formerly the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. Over the past 20 years, I have served in a variety of Therapy Manager and Physical Therapist roles... Read More →
avatar for Elena Lanza

Elena Lanza

Faculty, Northwestern University
avatar for Ronit Alexander

Ronit Alexander

Lecturer, Hebrew Language, Northwestern University
avatar for Kristina Wilson

Kristina Wilson

Senior Learning Designer (School of Professional Studies), Northwestern University
Let's chat about universal design for learning, andragogy, and teaching writing! Looking forward to connecting with you!


Thursday May 13, 2021 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/97895163060

1:00pm CDT

Connecting at Scale: Building a Massive Online Interprofessional Course
1,300 students, 100 facilitators, 13 professions, 7 colleges, 5 campuses…1 course. This is the underlying design challenge faced in building the University of Illinois Chicago’s (UIC) “Foundations of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice” (FICP) course.

FICP is UIC’s early learner interprofessional education (IPE) course, which serves as a foundation for scaffolding all UIC health science colleges’ and programs’ higher-level IPE courses.

FICP was designed as a hybrid course, with three online modules followed by a face-to-face immersion event. In 2020 and 2021, COVID-19 forced us to convert the face-to-face immersion into a synchronous online event.

In spring 2021, UIC enrolled 1,300 students in FICP and recruited over 100 faculty, staff, and advanced students as facilitators who convened on April 9 and April 16 in two synchronous online events.

IPE is fundamentally about connection – connecting students, faculty, clinicians, and leaders across professions and organizational units. A fundamental challenge for IPE is generating such connectivity at scale. The FICP course demonstrates that this challenge can be overcome, even amidst a pandemic-driven online pivot.

This session explores the design challenges of building a massive online interprofessional course and the implications for meeting the universal challenge of connecting at scale.

This session is being sponsored by Panopto

Speakers
avatar for Frank Borgers

Frank Borgers

Chair, UIC Interprofessional Curriculum Workgroup, University of Illinois Chicago
Interprofessional education and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Sponsors
avatar for Panopto

Panopto

Record, share, and manage videos securely.


Thursday May 13, 2021 1:00pm - 1:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

1:00pm CDT

Jumping the Institutional Gulf: An Innovative Course for Primary Data Skills
The inclusion of hands-on instruments in many science courses is limited by significant technological and financial barriers. An equally significant challenge is growing students’ confidence so that they can meaningfully address local and global problems. The need for “sense of agency” is greatest in minority-serving institutions and communities facing environmental injustice. To address these challenges, the Cave Pearl Project developed an open-source datalogger system from inexpensive components that work within the practical limits of STEM courses. In EARTH 360 at Northwestern University, students with no prior electronics or coding experience assemble, program, and gather data. Variants of the course are now offered at Nevada State College and Indiana University South Bend.

This panel brings together our collaborating faculty dedicated to empowering students as knowledge creators from these wide-ranging U.S. institutions – R1 (NU), satellite campus of a large state university (IUSB), and small state college (NSC). These educators will discuss their successes, along with ongoing challenges overcoming institutional, personal, and pedagogical barriers to running problem-based courses that combine aspects of engineering and environmental science. Student personal growth has been phenomenal, with often uncomfortable development of troubleshooting skills that are hard to teach with commercial lab equipment.

Speakers
avatar for Patricia A Beddows

Patricia A Beddows

Associate Professor of Instruction & Assistant Chair / Earth & Planetary Sciences; Director / Environmental Science Pr, Northwestern University
avatar for Brian Davis

Brian Davis

Associate Adjunct, Indiana University South Bend
Associate Adjunct at a branch campus of Indiana University for more than 20 years, teaching physics, labs, biophysics, astronomy, and most recently datalogging and digital electronics. A deep interest in the natural world that includes rock climbing, caving, and hiking, and a passion... Read More →


Thursday May 13, 2021 1:00pm - 1:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

1:00pm CDT

Building a Classroom Community Using Community of Inquiry Framework
Please note, workshops require additional registration. See the workshop's Eventbrite listing for more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/building-a-classroom-community-using-community-of-inquiry-framework-coi-tickets-151847769767

Online learning communities are essential to create rich learning environments where students experience others’ presence and feel a sense of belonging. A strong learning community can also reduce student burnout and increase student satisfaction. Student-faculty/staff and student-student interactions are the most significant factors contributing to undergraduate student learning, motivation, identity development, well-being, graduation rates, and post-graduation career and civic outcomes (Mayhew et al., 2016). In this workshop, regardless of ⁠whether attendees are teaching in an online or face-to-face active learning classroom,⁠ the importance and the basics of building a community will be covered, with an emphasis on a theoretical framework called Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework. The participants will engage in a series of interactive brainstorming sessions to find digital activities or strategies using the CoI framework as a guide. By the end of the workshop, the participants will have developed a working list of practical community-building ideas, and they will reflect on how they can further instill a sense of belonging through creating meaningful and purposeful interaction opportunities.

Speakers
avatar for Bryan Libbin

Bryan Libbin

Interim Sr. Director of Academic Technology, School of Communication, Northwestern University


Thursday May 13, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room Link to join included in the Eventbrite reminder email.

1:00pm CDT

The Active Classroom in Online Environments: Increasing Student Engagement
Please note, workshops require additional registration. See the workshop's Eventbrite listing for more information: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-active-classroom-in-online-environments-increasing-student-engagement-tickets-151829266423

We will discuss different ways of engaging students virtually, focusing on lectures and assignments. We’ll split the time between the interface of Zoom for live synchronous sessions and asynchronous means of engaging with the course through assessment design, including discussion boards, projects, quizzes, and papers. Throughout the session, we’ll demonstrate tools and tips that we use from just within Zoom and Canvas, without any additional add-on or external programs. We’ll emphasize the ability to capitalize on active-learning techniques meaningfully, even in larger courses.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Clipperton

Jean Clipperton

Assistant Professor of Instruction, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences
Clipperton’s research focuses upon institutional design and change, problem-solving, and pedagogy/teaching and learning. Her recent work has focused upon gender in the discipline of political science. Her research incorporates ideas and approaches from political science, complex... Read More →
avatar for Galya Ben-Arieh

Galya Ben-Arieh

Professor Instruction, Political Science and Legal Studies, Northwestern University
I'm a professor of instruction in the Political Science Department at Northwestern University and have worked for over 20 years as a lawyer and researcher in refugee and forced migration studies. As an action researcher, I work relationally with communities both in the United States... Read More →


Thursday May 13, 2021 1:00pm - 2:30pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room Link to join included in the Eventbrite reminder email.

2:00pm CDT

Connecting Students with Each Other and the Larger Northwestern Ecosystem
Participants in this workshop will learn concrete tools to promote peer engagement inside and outside the classroom. Peer engagement within the classroom needs to be systemically designed in the curriculum and assessment process. It is critical that engagement not be measured based on extroversion or simply "speaking in class." Professor Heather Aranyi will present rubrics and assessment tools that she has developed to measure authentic connection and contribution within the classroom community. Engagement within the larger Northwestern ecosystem can also be a powerful tool in facilitating connection. Her collaboration with librarian Mariah McGregor will present a road map for how faculty can increase peer connection inside and outside of the classroom through cross-departmental collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Mariah McGregor

Mariah McGregor

Business & Entrepreneurship Librarian, Northwestern Univeristy


Thursday May 13, 2021 2:00pm - 2:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 2 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/99862644779

2:00pm CDT

Empowering Collaboration in Asynchronous Problem-Based Learning
This presentation will focus on how we support collaboration in two brand new asynchronous programs at the Columbia University School of Professional Studies. The pedagogical framework for both programs is problem-based learning.

We will be exploring this topic from three different interconnected perspectives: instructional design, educational technology, and student data insights. We will share how we have leveraged these three perspectives to empower collaboration using a rubric designed to optimize group dynamics, peer-to-peer reflection, and individual skill development.

Topics covered in the presentation will include:
1) How we at Columbia SPS design problem-based learning in asynchronous master’s level programs; 2) How we address the challenges of asynchronous group work and collaboration; and 3) How we leverage student data insights to facilitate iterative teaching practice, instructional design, and educational technology implementation.

Speakers
avatar for Domi Enders

Domi Enders

Chief Diversity Officer, School of Professional Studies, Columbia University


Thursday May 13, 2021 2:00pm - 2:45pm CDT
Zoom Webinar 1 https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/93496472438

3:00pm CDT

Birds of a Feather: The Next Normal
A closed, topical discussion only for members of the Northwestern community.

Speakers
avatar for Victoria Getis

Victoria Getis

Director, Teaching & Learning Technologies, Northwestern University


Thursday May 13, 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm CDT
Zoom Meeting Room 2 By invitation only.
 
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